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Hong Kong to continue implementing U.N. sanctions on N. Korea

All Headlines 20:12 July 23, 2010

By Kim Young-gyo

HONG KONG, July 23 (Yonhap) -- The government of Hong Kong affirmed its commitment Friday to continue implementing punitive U.N. sanctions imposed on North Korea to end its nuclear ambitions.

"Hong Kong will continue to exercise vigilance in enforcing our regulation to effectively implement the United Nations Security Coucil sanctions against DPRK," Josephine Lo, an official at the Commerce and Economic Development Bureau of the Hong Kong government, told Yonhap News, using the North's official name, the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

"Our law enforcement agencies will take appropriate actions on those found in violation of the laws," she said.

The comment was made after U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's announcement Wednesday that the U.S. will hit North Korea with a new set of sanctions to punish it for its sinking of a South Korean warship and prevent it from further provocations.

Those sanctions will "strengthen our enforcement of U.N. Security Council resolutions 1718 and 1874" adopted after North Korea's first and second nuclear tests in 2006 and 2009, Clinton said at a joint press conference in Seoul after a meeting with South Korea's foreign and defense ministers.

Hong Kong legislated what is called the U.N. Sanctions Regulation in June 2007 to implement the U.N. Security Council Resolution 1718, according to Lo.

In January, Hong Kong amended the regulation to implement the new and expanded sanctions against North Korea under the Security Council Resolution 1874, she said.

A source here said earlier Friday that the United States has identified about 200 bank accounts with links to North Korea, and that the country is expected to freeze some 100 of those suspected of being used for weapons exports and other illicit purposes banned under U.N. resolutions.

The U.S. State Department said the U.S. will carry out new sanctions within two weeks to cut off money from illicit trafficking of weapons of mass destruction and counterfeit currency or luxury goods flowing into the North Korean leadership.

North Korea has bristled at the announcement of new sanctions and Seoul's plan to conduct large-scale joint naval exercises with the U.S., claiming the moves pose grave threats to regional peace.

ygkim@yna.co.kr
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