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Yonhap News Summary

All Headlines 17:19 April 04, 2016

The following is the second summary of major stories moved by Yonhap News Agency on Monday.

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S. Korea slaps 5 pastors with fines for unauthorized contact with N. Koreans

SEOUL -- South Korea's unification ministry said Monday it has slapped five pastors with 2 million won (US$1,740) fines each for meeting North Koreans without the government's approval.

The pastors belonging to the National Council of Churches in Korea (NCCK) met with their North Korean counterparts in China in late February without receiving the ministry's approval for their contact.

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Excitement fills K-pop concert in Mexico, fans greet their stars in Korean

MEXICO CITY -- The wave of hallyu, or Korean pop culture, swept through Mexico City over the weekend as South Korean performers showed off their ability to wow audiences around the world.

Mexican K-pop fans had formed a long line from 11 a.m., four hours before the kickoff of Sunday's concert, in front of the concert hall Teatro Metropolitan in the capital city. They enthusiastically held pickets and recited their favorite bands and performers in Korean.

The event was timed to take place as South Korea's president visits the country.

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Japan's annual report to note improvement in Seoul-Tokyo relations

TOKYO -- South Korea and Japan are each other's most important neighbors, sharing strategic interests, a draft of Tokyo's annual foreign policy report said Monday.

Japan's ties with South Korea have greatly advanced since last year's bilateral deal to settle the issue of Korean women forced to work at wartime Japanese military brothels, said the draft Diplomatic Bluebook for 2016 obtained by Kyodo News Service.

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(News Focus) Backlash holding up S. Korea, Japan wartime sexual slavery deal

SEOUL -- Some 100 days after South Korea and Japan agreed to settle the thorny issue of the latter's wartime sexual enslavement of Korean women, an unrelenting backlash from the victims and their supporters remains a stumbling block to the enforcement of the agreement, analysts here said Monday.

From staging regular protests in front of the Japanese Embassy in Seoul to filing a lawsuit to invalidate the Dec. 28 agreement, victims and civic groups have voiced their vociferous opposition to the deal, that Seoul and Tokyo hopes will lay to rest a part of their troubled history.

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(News Focus) Rival parties offer opposite remedies for ailing economy

SEOUL -- Apparently true to their identities, South Korea's political parties are proposing different economic policies as part of their campaign pledges that are nearly opposite in about every aspect except what the cause of the problem is.

Both the ruling Saenuri Party and the main opposition Minjoo Party are pointing to sluggish consumer spending as a root cause of problems facing Asia's fourth-largest economy that include a record high unemployment rate for young adults.

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Ex-President Roh Tae-woo's son found to be running offshore paper companies

SEOUL -- The eldest son of South Korea's former President Roh Tae-woo was found to have established three paper companies overseas in a tax haven region, an independent online news outlet reported Monday, raising suspicions that the move is linked to an attempt to evade paying due taxes.

Roh Jae-heon, the 50-year-old son of the general-turned-president who served as president from 1988 to 1993, launched the three firms in the British Virgin Islands in May 2012, according to Newstapa.

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Seoul National University lags far behind peers in global research ranking

SEOUL -- South Korea's Seoul National University (SNU) lags far behind other high-ranking schools in the world in the number of international joint research papers published by its faculty, according to the SNU's Senate on Monday.

The prestigious university only ranked seventh out of eight top-ranked universities checked in terms of international joint research treatises published from 2010 to 2014, according to an analysis by a 12-member research team.
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