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Yonhap News Summary

All Headlines 16:51 October 10, 2016

The following is the second summary of major stories moved by Yonhap News Agency on Monday.

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U.S. envoy visits home of N.K. defector leading human rights group

SEOUL -- The United States ambassador to the United Nations visited a home of a North Korean defector leading a human rights group in South Korea on Monday in an apparent bid to highlight dismal conditions in the reclusive country.

According to her Twitter account and photos posted there, Samantha Power visited the Seoul home of Jung Gwang-il, head of "No Chain," a nonprofit organization working to bring attention to human rights violations taking place in the North. He is a former North Korean inmate in the Yodok prison camp, also known as Camp 15.

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(LEAD) S. Korean shares close higher on improved investor sentiment

SEOUL -- South Korean shares closed slightly higher Monday as continued anticipation of favorable third quarter earnings boosted investor sentiment here, analysts said. The local currency also gained ground against the U.S. greenback.

The benchmark Korea Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI) closed at 2,056.82, adding 0.15 percent or 3.02 points. Trading volume was slim at 309 million shares, worth 4.56 trillion won (US$4.11 billion) with gainers outnumbering losers 451 to 357.

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S. Korean cosmetics enjoy surging demand abroad: KOTRA

SEOUL -- South Korean cosmetics have seen a dramatic surge in demand in overseas markets as their innovative makeup and skincare products are attracting a global audience, the Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Agency (KOTRA) said Monday.

According to KOTRA's survey on overseas buyers in 55 nations, cosmetics were the most popular item among South Korea's top 100 export list, taking the spot for the second consecutive year.

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(News Focus) Illegal Chinese fishing boats in Korean waters becoming increasingly violent

SEOUL/INCHEON -- Chinese boats illegally fishing in South Korean waters have been a source of diplomatic strain between the two countries over the past few years as they have become increasingly violent and hard to control.

Despite Beijing's efforts to get its fishermen to stop the illegal activities and follow relevant laws, Chinese boats have continued to poach in other countries' waters as fish stocks at home have become depleted. The inability of Chinese authorities to effectively regulate illegal fishing has exacerbated the situation, experts say.

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Transport minister labels truckers' strike illegal, vows stern punishment

SEOUL -- South Korea's transportation minister on Monday vowed stern measures against what he called an illegal strike by unionized cargo truck drivers while pledging to take available means to minimize the fallout on the local economy.

The warning came hours after some 7,000 truckers began staging a walkout while demanding the withdrawal of a recent government plan on modernizing the country's shipping industry.

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Pre-emptive strikes are possible option if signs of N.K. nuke attack: military

SEOUL -- Pre-emptive strikes against North Korea's nuclear and missile facilities are an option if there are signs of an imminent nuclear strike by Pyongyang, South Korea's military said Monday.

Defense Ministry spokesman Moon Sang-gyun made the remarks during a press briefing when he was asked about how Seoul planned to cope with the North's evolving nuclear and missile treats, as well as growing calls for such a move in the United States.

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PM urges N. Korea to give up nukes, missiles

SEOUL -- Prime Minister Hwang Kyo-ahn said Monday North Korea must end its development of nukes and missiles that pose threats to international peace, adding South Korea will join forces with other countries to induce Pyongyang to end such provocations.

He made the call in Thailand at the gathering of the Asia Cooperation Dialogue (ACD), a 34-member body created in June 2002 to promote Asian exchanges. Hwang also said Pyongyang must instead put more effort into improving the livelihood of North Koreans.
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