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One in 3 chaebol family members take shares as collateral

All Headlines 10:14 October 12, 2016

SEOUL, Oct. 12 (Yonhap) -- One in three family members of South Korea's major conglomerate owners have put up shares as collateral for loans from financial institutions, with the percentage of share collateral soaring for financially troubled business groups, a market tracker said Wednesday.

In a report on collateral provided by 363 owner family members of the country's top 30 conglomerates, known here as chaebol, CEO Score said that 30.3 percent, or 110 people, have offered their shares as collateral for loans as of end-September.

The value of their shares put up as collateral totals 6.4 trillion won (US$5.69 billion), or 9.5 percent of their combined shareholdings worth 67.9 trillion won. The percentage was up from 9.1 percent at the end of October last year.

In particular, approximately 51 percent of those who have offered share collateral were born after 1970, said CEO Score, which tracks corporate performance in the country.

"It is construed as suggesting that the young chaebol family members have put up their shares as collateral to raise funds for receiving gifts from their parents or business succession," CEO Score said.

One in 3 chaebol family members take shares as collateral - 1

Hyosung Group had the largest amount of shares provided as collateral with 1.37 trillion won, trailed by Doosan Group with 867.7 billion won and CJ Group with 837 billion won.

Hyundai Group recorded the biggest hike in the percentage of share collateral to its total shareholdings with the number spiking to 42.8 percent as of the end of September this year from 4.8 percent at the end of October 2015.

The jump was attributed to Hyundai's recent financial crunch. Creditors led by the state-run Korea Development Bank have recently taken control of Hyundai Merchant Marine Co. from the group as part of restructuring of the debt-heavy No. 2 South Korean shipper.

Hyundai was followed by Hanjin Group whose number soared to 54 percent from 17.8 percent over the cited period in the wake of a cash crisis at its shipping subsidiary.

Early last month, Hanjin Shipping, the world's No. 7 shipping line, was put under court receivership as its creditors, led by the state-run Korea Development Bank, rejected its latest self-rescue package.
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