Go to Contents Go to Navigation

Yonhap News Summary

Yonhap News Summary 17:30 April 30, 2021

The following is the second summary of major stories moved by Yonhap News Agency on Friday.

-----------------
Moon hails law on preventing conflicts of interest among public officials

SEOUL -- President Moon Jae-in said Friday that it is highly meaningful for the National Assembly to have passed a long-stalled bill intended to prevent civil servants from taking advantage of their positions for private gain.

A "systemic framework" for high integrity of the public sector has been established, he wrote on his social media accounts.

-----------------
Samsung heirs pay 1st installment of inheritance taxes

SEOUL -- Heirs of late Samsung Group chief Lee Kun-hee on Friday paid their first installment of record inheritance taxes after reporting to the authorities.

They announced Wednesday that they would pay more than 12 trillion won (US$10.7 billion) in inheritance taxes, the largest amount in the country's history, in installments. They paid one-sixth of inherited assets upfront and will pay the rest over the next five years.

-----------------
Gov't remains unperturbed by mounting calls for pardoning jailed Samsung heir

SEOUL -- Calls for pardoning Lee Jae-yong, the incarcerated de facto chief of Samsung Group, have resurfaced after his family unveiled plans to donate a chunk of the immense assets inherited from Lee's late father and company Chairman Lee Kun-hee.

But the government and the ruling party remain adamant that it is too early to deliberate on the issue.

-----------------
U.S. conducts 2 tests for THAAD-Patriot system integration last year: government report

SEOUL -- The U.S. missile defense agency conducted two missile flight tests last year to integrate its Patriot and THAAD missile systems, but they were unsuccessful due to software problems, a U.S. government report has showed.

The U.S. is working to upgrade its Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) batteries around the world, including one in South Korea, to add advanced radar and to integrate the system with Patriot missiles.

-----------------
Four-term lawmaker, ex-Ulsan mayor elected as new floor leader of main opposition party

SEOUL -- Four-term legislator and ex-Mayor of Ulsan Rep. Kim Gi-hyeon was elected the new floor leader of the main opposition People Power Party on Friday.

Kim, based in the southeastern city of Ulsan, secured 66 of the 100 ballots cast in the party's runoff voting to become the new floor leader, defeating rival Rep. Kim Tae-heum.

He will replace Rep. Joo Ho-young, who is retiring as floor leader and acting party chairman.

-----------------
'Everything for everyone' set for epitaph of late Cardinal Nicholas Cheong Jin-suk

SEOUL -- "Everything for everyone," the pastoral motto of late Cardinal Nicholas Cheong Jin-suk, will be on his tombstone, a Catholic church official said Friday.

Cheong, who was given the title of cardinal in 2006 by Pope Benedict XVI, died Tuesday night at the age of 89. He served as the Catholic Archbishop of Seoul for 14 years from 1998.

-----------------
Military chiefs of S. Korea, U.S., Japan vow to strengthen cooperation

SEOUL -- The top uniformed officers of South Korea, the United States and Japan held talks in Hawaii and vowed to strengthen their trilateral cooperation amid concerns over North Korea's nuclear and missile programs, Seoul's Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) said Friday.

During the talks held Thursday (Hawaii time), South Korea's JCS Chairman Gen. Won In-choul, Gen. Mark Milley of the U.S. and Gen. Koji Yamazaki of Japan shared concerns over the North's nuclear and missiles programs and discussed the "importance of promoting a rules-based international order in the region," according to the military.
(END)

HOME TOP
Send Feedback
How can we improve?
Thanks for your feedback!